Tag: diet books

Quinoa, kale and chicken bowls

quinoa, kale and chicken bowls

During the month of February I basically revamped my diet, which has been a long overdue project I’ve been avoiding. I’ve been carrying an extra 20 lbs around for the past 4 years and I finally decided I’d had enough and it was time to get my eating habits under control. I have been unhappy with my weight for a long time and so, instead of complaining about it like usual, I tackled it and really committed to healthy eating. Sigh. It hasn’t been easy especially when results have been slow, which are due to a number of factors that I am ironing out and won’t bore you with here. But I’ve lost about 6 pounds, which is better than nothing, and I feel healthier, which is key. I think my hair is shinier and my skin looks better. So, needless to say I’m going to stick with it. I might not be able to keep up the no dairy, no carb, no sugar, no alcohol thing for much longer but I feel like I can keep those things to a minimum now. After all we really shouldn’t be “on a diet” so to speak. We should be making a “lifestyle change”. Any health expert or doctor will tell you that. (more…)

Mindless Eating book Review

Mindless Eating

Image Source

I’ve totally fallen behind on my resolution to read 15 books this year but I’m climbing back on the bandwagon. I love to read and I really need to make more time for it! After starting it in March, I recently (read: finally) finished the book, Mindless Eating, by Brian Wansink.

Overall, I really enjoyed the book. Brian Wansink is a Food Psychologist and his book explores the reasons behind certain food choices we make and why we often overeat. Some of his findings are truly fascinating and he includes tips and tricks for how to “mindlessly” lose weight instead of mindlessly gaining weight. Simple steps, like changing the clear, see-through candy jar on your desk at work to a colored, opaque jar can actually save you from eating a number of calories throughout the week. I liked this book because it focuses on small lifestyle changes as opposed to drastic diets, which, the author points out, almost always fail. The author points out many invisible factors that influence our food/meal choices and it has certainly helped to make me more aware of why I’m choosing to eat something. (more…)

%d bloggers like this: